Ten years on from the Great Financial Crash, millions feel no further forward. Because they’re not. We’re mired in the worst squeeze on living standards since the days of Dickens. And now this crippling, seemingly endless malaise, has provoked the worst crisis of cooperation for a generation; we are divided between rich and poor, between young and old, and now with our closest neighbours with the vote for Brexit.

One way to think about today's 'crisis of the West' is to look at the economic growth rates in economically and politically 'free' versus 'unfree' nations. If you believe that economic and political freedom are linked (as I do), you would assume that free countries grow faster. For much of the post-war era that has indeed been true. But no longer.

Our community is one of the poorest in Britain and over the summer I am updating my research into the causes of poverty and low income.

I am looking for people to interview who have a household income of £13,000 a year or less.

The telephone interview will be strictly confidential and will be undertaken by my senior researcher Erik Cummins. It will take about 30-45 minutes.

New figures produced by the House of Commons Library reveal that Birmingham's National Health Service (NHS) is being short-changed by £56 million every year compared to other parts of the country – and the shortfall is set to rise to over £70 million by 2020.

The figures which show how much the Birmingham NHS (known as Birmingham CrossCity CCG) is funded for every person in its area.

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